Waving

Waving service

Waving service

 

The art of building a fabric

Weaving is the art of building a fabric. It is obtained by weaving the warp threads with the weft thread. Since 2004 Maeko Tessuti & Filati Naturali has started collaborating with a historic company that has been producing fabrics for four generations. Thanks to the know-how accumulated over the years, this company produces for Maeko a wide range of high quality fabrics. This weaving factory, born in 1925, is part of the Piedmontese cotton industrial area, and is equipped with solid looms that work slower than modern machines. These looms are ideal for guaranteeing the right balance between the knitting timing and the thread tension, thus favoring an excellent process for the production of fabrics and especially for high quality hemp. The philosophy of this production is strongly oriented towards the enhancement of human capital, as well as the respect for the environment. The environmental impact is reduced, thanks to the use of photovoltaic solar panels. The modernization of the structure is happily combined with criteria that meet the most current needs of the people and their territory.

The other great fabric production process, in addition to weaving, is knitting: we are talking about jersey fabric. Maeko’s jersey fabric is made by several Italian manufacturers carefully chosen according to the type of reinforcement and the type of fibers.

Maeko cultivates its vision through these close collaborations, blending high quality products with ethics, paying the utmost attention in choosing and using excellent products and services for its creations. Maeko uses only excellent companies to weave noble and unique fibers.

 

 

The art of building a fabric

Weaving is the art of building a fabric. It is obtained by weaving the warp threads with the weft thread. Since 2004 Maeko Tessuti & Filati Naturali has started collaborating with a historic company that has been producing fabrics for four generations. Thanks to the know-how accumulated over the years, this company produces for Maeko a wide range of high quality fabrics. This weaving factory, born in 1925, is part of the Piedmontese cotton industrial area, and is equipped with solid looms that work slower than modern machines. These looms are ideal for guaranteeing the right balance between the knitting timing and the thread tension, thus favoring an excellent process for the production of fabrics and especially for high quality hemp. The philosophy of this production is strongly oriented towards the enhancement of human capital, as well as the respect for the environment. The environmental impact is reduced, thanks to the use of photovoltaic solar panels. The modernization of the structure is happily combined with criteria that meet the most current needs of the people and their territory.

The other great fabric production process, in addition to weaving, is knitting: we are talking about jersey fabric. Maeko’s jersey fabric is made by several Italian manufacturers carefully chosen according to the type of reinforcement and the type of fibers.

Maeko cultivates its vision through these close collaborations, blending high quality products with ethics, paying the utmost attention in choosing and using excellent products and services for its creations. Maeko uses only excellent companies to weave noble and unique fibers.

SHUTTLE WEAVING

The shuttle fabrics are obtained with a loom on which the warp threads are mounted, through which the weft thread passes though. The shuttle was a wooden element used in the past to make the spool of the weft travel from one end of the warp to the other. Nowadays the movement of the weft is obtained with pliers or with other more particular systems such as jets of air or water.

The warp is made up of a series of threads arranged parallel to each other. The weft thread comes and goes through the warp threads passing above or below them. On the edge of the shuttle fabric, consequently, the series of curves with which the weft exits and re-enters the warp is visible; these edges are called selvedges.

Shuttle fabrics contrast with the other large family of fabrics, knitted fabrics. Shuttle fabrics, also called loom fabrics, are generally less soft and elastic than knitted fabrics. On the other hand, they are more resistant, stable and compact, last longer over time and do not shrink with washing.

In twill armor, the weaves between weft and warp are less dense, and are arranged in such a way that diagonals appear on the fabric. These diagonals can also alternate in opposite directions generating a herringbone figure. Twill fabrics adapt more easily to shapes than canvas, are softer and more comfortable, do not wrinkle, and are therefore suitable for the production of clothing.

A well-known example of twill weave is denim used for jeans. Tartan, tweed, gabardine, batavia, moleskin, pied de poule and loden also fall into the category of twill.

In satin armor, the weaves between the weft thread and the warp are less dense than the canvas and twill. The lesser number of weaves means that the fabric obtained with this weave is smoother, and therefore shinier, on the straight side (where the warp threads are seen), while it is rougher on the reverse side (with a dominant weave). The lower number of weaves also makes the satin softer than the other two main weaves. The disadvantage is that it tends to be more delicate, precisely because the weft and warp are looser. Satin is usually made with fine, uniform and shiny yarns, which enhance the brightness and softness typical of this armor

Satin forms the basis for the creation of sateen, brocade, damask and lampas.

JERSEY WEAVING

Jersey is an elastic fabric suitable for creating tight and comfortable garments. It was originally used by fishermen on the English island of Jersey, from which it takes its name. In the early 1900s, Coco Chanel started using it for women's clothing, and since then the presence of Jersey has become a constant in the fashion field.

Jersey is a stockinette stitch fabric. This means that the straight side is smoother (shaved), while the reverse side is more granular. Jersey is typically composed of very dense stitches that can be made with many different types of yarn.

Jersey's elasticity is due to the fact that it is knitted rather than with a warp and weft overlay (typical of shuttle fabrics). In knitted fabrics, each thread is arranged in a series of curves and counter-curves called bushes, or loops. Two bushes together form a link, and each link acts like a small spring that can stretch and retreat. It is this effect that gives knitted fabrics, including Jersey, their typical elasticity.

Thanks to its lightness and elasticity, Jersey adapts perfectly to the shapes of the body and is used to create tight and comfortable clothing such as T-shirts, briefs, socks, sportswear. Jersey also combines comfort with the insulating properties that allow it to protect us from the cold (think of the leggings that are used in winter).

SHUTTLE WEAVING

The shuttle fabrics are obtained with a loom on which the warp threads are mounted, through which the weft thread passes though. The shuttle was a wooden element used in the past to make the spool of the weft travel from one end of the warp to the other. Nowadays the movement of the weft is obtained with pliers or with other more particular systems such as jets of air or water.

The warp is made up of a series of threads arranged parallel to each other. The weft thread comes and goes through the warp threads passing above or below them. On the edge of the shuttle fabric, consequently, the series of curves with which the weft exits and re-enters the warp is visible; these edges are called selvedges.

Shuttle fabrics contrast with the other large family of fabrics, knitted fabrics. Shuttle fabrics, also called loom fabrics, are generally less soft and elastic than knitted fabrics. On the other hand, they are more resistant, stable and compact, last longer over time and do not shrink with washing.

In twill armor, the weaves between weft and warp are less dense, and are arranged in such a way that diagonals appear on the fabric. These diagonals can also alternate in opposite directions generating a herringbone figure. Twill fabrics adapt more easily to shapes than canvas, are softer and more comfortable, do not wrinkle, and are therefore suitable for the production of clothing.

A well-known example of twill weave is denim used for jeans. Tartan, tweed, gabardine, batavia, moleskin, pied de poule and loden also fall into the category of twill.

In satin armor, the weaves between the weft thread and the warp are less dense than the canvas and twill. The lesser number of weaves means that the fabric obtained with this weave is smoother, and therefore shinier, on the straight side (where the warp threads are seen), while it is rougher on the reverse side (with a dominant weave). The lower number of weaves also makes the satin softer than the other two main weaves. The disadvantage is that it tends to be more delicate, precisely because the weft and warp are looser. Satin is usually made with fine, uniform and shiny yarns, which enhance the brightness and softness typical of this armor

Satin forms the basis for the creation of sateen, brocade, damask and lampas.

JERSEY WEAVING

Jersey is an elastic fabric suitable for creating tight and comfortable garments. It was originally used by fishermen on the English island of Jersey, from which it takes its name. In the early 1900s, Coco Chanel started using it for women's clothing, and since then the presence of Jersey has become a constant in the fashion field.

Jersey is a stockinette stitch fabric. This means that the straight side is smoother (shaved), while the reverse side is more granular. Jersey is typically composed of very dense stitches that can be made with many different types of yarn.

Jersey's elasticity is due to the fact that it is knitted rather than with a warp and weft overlay (typical of shuttle fabrics). In knitted fabrics, each thread is arranged in a series of curves and counter-curves called bushes, or loops. Two bushes together form a link, and each link acts like a small spring that can stretch and retreat. It is this effect that gives knitted fabrics, including Jersey, their typical elasticity.

Thanks to its lightness and elasticity, Jersey adapts perfectly to the shapes of the body and is used to create tight and comfortable clothing such as T-shirts, briefs, socks, sportswear. Jersey also combines comfort with the insulating properties that allow it to protect us from the cold (think of the leggings that are used in winter).